Hip-Hop and it don’t Stop

Hip-Hop and It Don't

Hip Hop (1970s) was used as a means of freedom of speech for the black community. In rap songs, it was typical to hear stories about poverty, police brutality, and racial discrimination; topics that were common in the black community at the time. As a means of oppression, police would often prohibit black rap artists like NWA and 2 Live Crew from performing certain songs claiming that the songs invoked public disorder.  Rappers like Slick Rick, Boogie Down Productions’ KRS-One and Kane’s fellow Juice Crew alum Kool G Rap were important in paving the way for what hip hop culture looked like in the 80’s and the years to come.

Elements:

  • Musical Depth
  • DJing
  • Breakdance
  • Graffiti
  • Lyrical Content

Common 80s Hip-Hop Artists

Big Daddy Kane, De La Soul, LL Cool J, Run DMC, Fat Boys, Slick Rick, Doug-E-Fresh, etc.

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Funkadelic

adelic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1It4rNbOCM Funk music  more of a freedom of expression for blacks. In this genre, the structure was more free and explicit to express identity

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80s Period Artists (2pm Class)

By: Bianca Brown, Jamil Dawson, Assata Gui’Chard, Kendall Heath, Donecia Mouring, Stephany Pogue, Sidnee Salter, Monét Stewart, Kamiya Watkins, and Nia Weeks      

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Ragtime, The Genre

Ragtime, The Genre By: Kamiya Watkins Ragtime is a music genre that dates back from the 1896 all the way until 1920. The defining characteristic

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