“Lift Every Voice: Marian Anderson, Florence B. Price And The Sound Of Black Sisterhood” Review

By: JaNae Fleming

In this article, Alisha Jones explores intersectionality through music, specifically through singer Marian Anderson and composer Florence B. Price. Since the beginning, African American music has been pivotal because it is sometimes reflective of the sociopolitical environment surrounding them. This history is reflected not only in the music itself but also in performance. Throughout the article, Jones is sure to reference the many political movements in today’s society that were started by black women, some of which being for black women. I found this article extremely fascinating because not only was Marian Anderson challenging the political environment through her performance but also through her choice in women composers. While I have been taught about many black women performers like Eartha Kitt, Etta James, and even Josephine Baker, many of which were accompanied by male singers and songwriters. Her ability to challenge racist, sexist, and classist acts of others through performance is incredible. In the article Jones also mentioned Eleanor Roosevelt and her “lady white savior” which I think is important because most stories about black history makers, especially in terms of musical performance, accompanies the help of white people. I believe Marian Anderson deserves the title of being groundbreaking because of the fact that not only did she become a history maker but so did many other women who worked with her.

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Jubilee Quartets

By: JaNae Fleming In the mid 1800s a new style of music occurred amongst African Americans. This genre specifically started with African American college students.

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Hip Hop

Hip-Hop emerged in the 1970s in Bronx, New York. Clive Campbell created the genre based on his Jamaican tradition. Hip-Hop became extremely popular in the

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Blues was the New Folk

Blues was the New Folk JaNae Fleming Blues music was used to express the hardships of the black working class in America. Just as folk

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Ragtime

By: JaNae Fleming Ragtime music was composed using the piano. It is composed in a duple meter where there is a syncopated lead being played

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Women in Jazz

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A Review on Negro Spirituals

By: JaNae Fleming Negro spirituals derived from folk music in terms of its elements. I feel that the biggest components of negro spirituals are its

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Negro Spirituals and Gospel

Like negro spirituals, gospel music is a sacred form of music used in the Christian belief. Gospel music emerged in urban cities like New York,

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Techno, Detroit’s Finest

Techno music was developed in the heart of Detroit, Michigan in 1980. Techno is a combination of African American music styling, with inspirations from Chicago,

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Disco in the 70s

By: JaNae Fleming Disco emerged in the 70s to promote freedom and liberation at the time. DIsco is compromised of funk and r&b. Disco was

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