Brown Skin Girl

#BlackGirlMagic. #BlackGirlsRock. #MelaninPoppin. #BlackBeauty. 

These are just a few of the hashtags that have been used in the last decade to describe Black Women. Not only have these hashtags been used in social media images such as Instagram and Twitter but they have also been used in music. The hip-hop industry has found a way to uplift and empower Black Women in the midst of the chaos against them. Artist such as Beyonce, Jay-z, Solange, and Wale have created movements and made statements just from their songs. 

Featured in The Lion King, a 2019 American animated musical film, a remake of the 1994 original film, Brown Skin Girl aims to point out the unique features of Black Women. The song describes hair, skin tone, and body shape as being the most beautiful features of a black girl. More importantly it speaks to black girls who have often been talked down on because of their skin. “Too dark”, “Lips too big”, “Too curvy”, are just a few of the phrases often repeated to black women.

Singin’ brown skin girl
Your skin just like pearls
The best thing in the world
 
Pose like a trophy when Naomis walk in
She need an Oscar for that pretty dark skin
Pretty like Lupita when the cameras close in
Drip broke the levee when my Kellys roll in
I think tonight she might braid her braids
Melanin too dark to throw her shade
She minds her business and wines her waist
Gold like 24k, okay

Oh, have you looked in the mirror lately? (lately)
Wish you could trade eyes with me (’cause)
There’s complexities in complexion
But your skin, it glow like diamonds
Dig me like the earth, you be giving birth
Took everything in life, baby, know your worth
I love everything about you, from your nappy curls
To every single curve, your body natural
Same skin that was broken be the same skin takin’ over

 Beyonce makes reference to known model, actress, and artist such as Naomi Campbell, Lupita Nyong’o and Kelly Rowland comparing their skin tone to diamonds and pearls. This song sends out a message to the masses. Black women should appreciate their skin tone, despite judgement from their white counterpart. 

Like Beyonce, Solange’s single “Almeda” aims to uplift the black community. Outlining characteristics and features that are only exclusive to the black community. Solange also mentions how nothing “black” can swiped away. Besides the song Almeda, Solannge tries to uplift the black women and the black community in general by incorporating lyrics like these in here songs. 

Brown liquor, brown liquor
Brown skin, brown face
Brown leather, brown sugar
Brown leaves, brown keys
Brown zippers, brown face
Black skin, black braids
Black waves, black days
Black baes, black days
These are black-owned things
Black faith still can’t be washed away

 

 Wales’ song “Black Girl Magic”, is specifically for black women. More importantly, the music video for this song emphasizes and shows black women celebrating. Unlike other artist, there are a variety of black women present and not just the “lightskin” or “skinny” women. Wale takes time to appreciate black women, stating “Show me a little black girl magic.” Wale highlights Taraji P. Henson 

 

 

Uh, black Benzes
Black fancy
Black bag full of old white men, issa
Whole queen would u hold my hand, would ya
Show me a lil’ black girl, look
Black Benzes
Black fancy
Black bag full of old white men, issa
Whole queen would u hold my hand, would ya
Show me a lil’ black girl magic

……

Go go go
Go shorty, get it shorty
Every Empire need a Taraji
Go shorty, I’m so proud of ya
Head high you is under nobody

Black artists in the 2010s aimed to enrich the black community despite the uproar and political injustices we faced. Other artists such as Nicki Minaj, Cardi B, Jay-z , Kendrick Lamar, Common, and other have also mentioned the need to uplift black women and black men. This style of music and intentional

More Songs from these Artist:

Aniyah Peterson

Aniyah Peterson

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