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Blame it on the Boogie!
The Disco Era

Disco was a genre heavily associated with freedom: it was a soundtrack of resistance, laced through other art forms such as film and fashion.

Characteristics:

  • Fast tempo
  • Orchestral elements to help strengthen the melody
  • Includes funk sounds

Instruments:

  • Horns, electric guitar, strong bass

 

Popular Artists:

Kool and the Gang, Donna Summer, Diana Ross, The Whispers

"Celebration" by Kool and the Gang

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History of Disco
Background
Disco began in New York City in the 1970s. The 70s was a time of radicalism and growing sentiments about personal freedom. The anti-war and hippie movements allowed disco to thrive. At the time, it was new sound. It allowed all people to freely express themselves through music. It allowed people who felt outcast to feel included, particularly the gay community.
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