2010: Decade of Rebels

The Rebels: 2010 Music

by Amber Sylvain

African American music is growing in popularity, expanding in style, and expanding in its moneymaking capabilities. African American music is always changing in multiple aspects, but remains the same  in its theme. African American music has always had a theme of rebellion. This theme is not restricted to music, but is prevalent throughout literature, art, poetry, and many other forms of expression. In poetry , African American poets wrote in the English language, but changed the rhetoric by making it their own. These pieces, though written in English, possessed deeper meanings, and messages of rebellion that only blacks could understand. 2010 music accomplished the same task. 2010 music, especially rap music, glorifies the use of illegal drugs, making money through selling drugs, and living a lifestyle that is unlike the traditional white American lifestyle. Black music of the 2010’s differs from the music that came before it in that its meaning is explicitly made known. African American rappers openly rebel against American traditions and values doing things that are against the law. There is a certain freedom that lies in defying the systems and people that you were oppressed by.

Examples:

NBA Youngboy’s “Make No Sense” raps of his exit from jail and returning to his previous lifestyle. With lyrics such as “all these diamonds dancing on my f** neck cost like 4 bricks”  and lyrics such as “I’m not alright b** I’ll put you under”, NBA youngboy conveys the rebellious theme of 2010 music. 

21 Savage and Metro Boomin’s No Heart speaks of Savage’s lifestyle of violence, rebellion, and making money with lyrics such as “Ask your b** how my d** tastes” and speaks of shooting his enemies grandmothers and mothers house until somebody dies.

In conclusion, 2010 African American rappers convey themes of rebellion from all aspects of life such as the government, morals, and the perceived “correct” way of living with the use of violence, drugs, and the over-sexualization of women in their songs. This behavior is prevalent throughout all forms of black expression because we are an oppressed people. 

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Amber Sylvain

Amber Sylvain

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